Control Center

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Digitrax Zephyr
2 "jump" throttles
and
the DC mine train control.

Luke & Nick Additions

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An overview

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Another Station

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Maintenance area

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Tunnel and road

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Road crossing and Parking lot

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Gold mine!



Routes and Switches

Routes & Switches



Incorporating JMRI routes to implement semi-automatic Switching.

routes oct 4 2014

Combined
typically one train
Lower Main + High Route
1 Closed
2 Closed (toggle to reverse direction)
7 Thrown
4 & 5 Closed (for mainline)

Crossover
typically one train
Lower Main + High Route + Crossover
1 Thrown
2 Closed (toggle to reverse direction)
3 Closed
4 Thrown
C & D Thrown for 2 trains (high and expanded Low)

Split Mains
2 Trains
7 Closed (separates routes)
Lower Main
1 Closed
2 Closed (toggle to reverse direction)
High Route
4 & 5 Closed (for mainline)

Switching Operations
Can be performed in conjunction with Split Mains or Combined operations.
Uses WiFi Throttle and manual switch control of switches in Staging, Crossover and Freight sections.

Layout Snapshot


Slowly incorporating remote control of Switches via JMRI.

Switch Kat
sta_dec_comparison_switchkat.htm

and DS64
ds64


Nov 2014

Trains

Superchief2SuperchiefB unit

Kato SuperChief


Run as a consist of the A and B Units.
Usually heads the combination Pennsy and Santa Fe SuperChief passenger cars.
Great running units.

In 1935 the Santa Fe inaugurated its premier first class sleeping car only train the "Super Chief". The "Super Chief", often referred to as "The Train of the Stars", was frequently patronized by Hollywood stars because of its fine accommodations, fine dining and fast 39 hr 45 min trip between Chicago and Los Angeles through the rich scenery of the American Southwest. Setting a new standard for luxury rail travel, it quickly became the most recognized train in the United States with its sleek silver and red warbonnet painted F units in the lead.


little yellow

Little Yellow


A Bachmann Spectrum 44 Ton Switcher.
A pretty capable little switcher.
The 1937 diesel agreement ruled that any engine weighing over 90,000 lbs required a fireman. The 44-tonner weighed in at 88,000 lbs, just under the limit. (and skirting the fireman requirement)



$_57
Grandma's Switcher
Alco’s 1,000-HP S4 switcher was the fourth entry in the company’s highly successful “S” series of diesel switchers. Their sturdy construction and ease of maintenance made them popular with a wide variety of railroads.
Finicky and low top end.



black beautyPennsy F7 ABlack Beauty B unit

Black Beauty


Built by General Motors in the early 1950‘s, the F7 is one of the most recognizable locomotives of the diesel age. During its peak of popularity, the F7 outsold all locomotives from all other builders combined! Often referred to as “covered wagons” or “bulldogs,” this locomotive was used for all railroad operations, including first class passenger service. Run throughout North America, many F7s are still in use today. These powered A & B units are finished in accurate paint schemes used in the 1950‘s and early 1960‘s.

Some creative help,...

Luke's a huge creative influence, as well.
But, he moves too fast to get pictures. :-)
Now, where'd he go?


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Mountain addition

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Adding to the mountainside. Repairing the rescue excavation scar, and lessening the layercake.

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Laying down some gravel

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Roadhouse corner landscaping

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New block in the city

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